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03May

Russell Hoban: Turtle Diary; Mr Rinyo-Clacton’s Offer; The Medusa Frequency – worth rejoicing in

The American writer’s first eight novels for adults have been reissued as Penguin Modern Classics, offering a banquet of whimsical delights

There are two types of people: those who rejoice that Russell Hoban’s first eight novels for adults have just been reissued as Penguin Modern Classics; and those who will rejoice once they’ve read them for the first time.

The Pennsylvania-born Hoban lived and worked in England, publishing his first novel in 1973, aged 48. He died in 2011. Best known at first as writer of children’s fiction, then for his post-apocalyptic novel Riddley Walker (1980), he once referred to his fans as a “bunch of charming weirdos”, which is a fitting description of his books too. Artworks by Eduardo Paolozzi used for the covers of these editions capture Hoban’s colourful eccentricity.

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