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Apr 07, 2020
Keep your books pristine while keeping tabs on your favorite lines and pages with these book darts and page markers.
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Apr 07, 2020
Audiobooks have allowed this Rioter to continue reading throughout this crisis, and to continue reading in the way that makes her happiest.
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Apr 07, 2020
Because everyone has their own idea about what constitutes a comfort read, here are two very different comforting books for each genre.
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Apr 07, 2020
We're giving away a $250 gift card to Barnes and Noble. To enter, just sign up for our Giveaways newsletter ...
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Apr 07, 2020
Consider some of your favorite classic fairy tales and take this quiz to find a YA fantasy book that puts a new spin on these familiar stories.
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Apr 07, 2020
A daily roundup of the most interesting and awesome bookish links from around the web!
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Apr 07, 2020

The Love, Nina author’s novel about a 18-year-old who moves above a dental surgery to escape her mother is set to raise laughs this month – do join in

Nina Stibbe’s Reasons to be Cheerful has come out of the hat and will be the subject of this month’s reading group. We asked for a book to cheer us up and there’s no question that this one is making a promise in its title.

Last year, it won the Bollinger Wodehouse prize for comic fiction, as well as warm and appreciative reviews in the UK and the US. Sam Leith called it “pitch perfect” in the Guardian, while Susan Coll wrote in the New York Times that it was “so dense with amusing detail that I thought about holding the book upside down to see if any extra funny bits might spill from the creases between the page”.

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Apr 07, 2020

When writing his book The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread - and Why They Stop, mathematician Adam Kucharski had no idea that it would come out during a pandemic. He speaks to Claire about the concept of “contagion” and the ways ideas, viruses, violence and misinformation spread in a population.

And Claire and Richard share some of your emails with tips for books to read in lockdown, and look over the International Booker prize shortlist.

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Apr 07, 2020

A dark detective adventure, a prophetic dragon and a prison breakout lead this spring’s treats for teen readers

Holly Jackson’s A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder was last year’s big breakout debut, introducing schoolgirl turned detective Pippa Fitz-Amobi. The sequel, Good Girl, Bad Blood (Electric Monkey, £7.99, May), is set one year later. Pippa and Ravi Singh have released a true crime podcast about the murder and are insistent their detecting days are behind them – until a local boy goes missing. Jackson ensnares readers in another highly addictive web, woven from the dark shadows of small-town secrets.

More mystery from Akala, the Bafta-winning musician and founder of the Hip-Hop Shakespeare Company, in The Dark Lady (Hachette, £12.99). In the brutal streets of Elizabethan London, Henry is a brown-skinned boy thief in the Devil’s Gap, the city’s most notorious slum. He survives on his wits and tough moral choices, and an exceptional secret gift. Themes of race, class and identity, familiar from Akala’s bestselling adult book Natives, are driven by powerful prose in an exhilarating, magic-laced adventure.

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Apr 06, 2020

A software developer’s epiphany inspires this admirable critique of capitalism, starting with the west coast tech tyrants

A month ago, when I began reading Wendy Liu’s polemic, I felt inclined to dismiss her as a millennial flibbertigibbet, motivated by a grudge against an industry that seemingly had no use for her. Liu grew up as a computing whiz-kid in Montreal and moved to San Francisco to develop software that aspired, a little tackily, to be “Tinder for advertisers”. When her entrepreneurial scheme fizzled out she transferred to the London School of Economics to study inequality, which turned her into an evangelising radical. In her book, she attacks the depressing doctrine of “capitalist realism” and its assumption that our current social and economic arrangements are unchangeable; with born-again zeal, she chastises her own “petty and narcissistic” nature and even laments “the tragedy of the human condition”. A bit excessive, surely, as a response to the failure of a startup?

But as I read on, everything changed. We now have good reason to question the pursuits of the vaunted innovators with whom Liu consorted in California – the blissed-out cultists at Google, whose only worry is over “the wrong kind of sparkling water in the microkitchens”, or the manic experts who specialise in “envisioning hyperplanes in n-dimensional space”. As Liu came to see, techies like these were already living extraterrestrially, having opted out of the earthly, bodily necessities that currently weigh us down. A colleague of hers said he would happily volunteer to join Elon Musk’s projected colony on Mars, the “backup” planet for menaced humanity. “You know you can never come back,” warned another of Liu’s friends. “I’d work remotely,” grinned the would-be Martian.

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Apr 06, 2020

From the Duchess of Cambridge’s canonical classics to Jon Snow’s eclectic collection, social isolation has opened a window on celebrity libraries

Lockdown Britain has added a new dimension to one of readers’ favourite games: nosing around other people’s shelves. With broadcasters and politicians addressing the nation from their own front rooms, it has become easier than ever. Now we don’t even have to go to someone’s home (fortunate in these times) to judge them by their reading habits. Now the libraries of the famous are laid bare for us all to mock or admire.

What does it tell us about Boris Johnson, for example, that he has a collection of big, gold-lettered, red-spined hardbacks that look as if they’ve come straight from the fabled library of Alexandria? Or that Prince Charles keeps a hefty Dick Francis close at hand? MSNBC’s Kasie Hunt and the Washington Post’s White House reporter Seung Min Kim both arrange their books by colour, it seems. Joe Wicks has beautiful shelves with … no books on them. And a screenshot of the “first ever digital cabinet”, shared by the PM, suggests that Jacob Rees-Mogg has one of those dream libraries with dark wood shelves and ladders on wheels.

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Apr 06, 2020
Win free books from the April 2020 batch of Early Reviewer titles! We’ve got 77 books this month, and a grand total of 2,673 copies to give out. Which books are you hoping to snag this month? Come tell us on Talk. If you haven’t already, sign up for Early Reviewers. If you’ve already signed […]
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Apr 06, 2020

Wendy Moore, the author of the magnificent Endell Street, pays tribute to the pioneering work and undying dedication of the female medics who, during the First World War, transformed a derelict old London workhouse into a state-of-the-art military hospital, operated by predominantly female staff.

In this exclusive essay, Moore talks about her experience of researching and writing the incredible story of two pioneering suffragette doctors – and lifelong companions – Flora Murray and Louisa Garrett Anderson, who operated on the frontline of their profession.

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Apr 06, 2020

The plague that took Shakespeare’s son can be seen in the world around us as we respond to coronavirus today, writes the novelist behind Hamnet

When I was a teenager, a strange rumour began to circulate around the small Scottish seaside town where I lived. Roadworks were demolishing the corner of an ancient churchyard, in order to widen the road. The site, long since abandoned, dated back to the 1600s, and contained a picturesque, ivy-clad ruin, open to the sky. It was a place much frequented by tenebrous adolescents like myself. The story was that several of the workmen had come down with a mysterious illness: fever and swellings in the lymph nodes. It was digging up the graves, we told each other, with gothic relish. They got the bubonic plague! It will spread! The whole town is going to die!

It didn’t, of course. The roadworks stalled briefly, a lurid fence around them, but nobody contracted the Black Death. Slightly disappointed, we kept going to school, and life carried on much as before.

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Apr 06, 2020

Your space to discuss the books you are reading and what you think of them

Welcome to this week’s blogpost. Here’s our roundup of your comments and photos from the last week.

Let’s start with a “good read for the times”. MissBurgundy recommends Xavier de Maistre’s 1794 “delight” Journey Around My Room (Voyage Autour De Ma Chambre):

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Apr 06, 2020

Accounts of bucolic isolation by Leïla Slimani and Marie Darrieussecq prompt charges of elitism and comparisons to Marie Antoinette

Leïla Slimani and Marie Darrieussecq may be two of France’s most acclaimed writers – but their accounts of life in lockdown in their second homes in the countryside have unleashed an outpouring of resentment among French readers, with one fellow writer even comparing Slimani to Marie Antoinette.

Slimani, who won the Prix Goncourt for her bestselling novel Lullaby, wrote in Le Monde of how she had left Paris and sequestered herself and her children in their countryside second home since 13 March, telling them that it was “a bit like Sleeping Beauty”. “Tonight, I couldn’t sleep,” she wrote. “Through my bedroom window, I watched dawn break over the hills. The icy grass, the lime trees on the branches of which the first buds appear.”

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Apr 06, 2020

A chance sighting of an ex-lover sets off very ambivalent emotions, but also a kind of miracle

Easter

You walk by holding a bunch of flowers
never knowing that you’ve just performed a miracle.
Are those flowers for your girl?
I imagine her dressed up like an Easter egg
in yellow and pink. I’d tap at you like an egg,
cracking your thin chocolate shell.
If I were made of chocolate too, I’d break
off parts of myself to give to you and your girl.
Once, I gave my words for garden
and water and moonlit and love
to a man who kissed me. After he rolled
a stone over my heart and shut me off
from the world, I had no words left
to describe the dark dream that followed.
Now you’ve walked by, godlike in jeans
and an old t-shirt, the sun glinting on one
silver earring. Now a rose is once again
not only rose but also soft and red
and thorn and bee and honey.
Now a bird is singing song and tree
and nest in a high place and blue speckled egg.
You yourself are glowing with words, they move
up and down you as if they’re alive.
The words bring themselves to me
and tell my tongue sweetness over and over.
The words are everything. With them,
I’ll turn water to wine at your wedding.

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Apr 06, 2020
The best book deals of the day, curated by Book Riot.
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Apr 06, 2020

One of the year’s most exciting YA fiction releases and a must for fans of Pretty Little Liars and One Of Us Is Lying, The Magpie Society: One for Sorrow is an unmissable high-stakes, high school thriller. The first in a series and promising a tantalising combination of clique rivalry, murder, mystery and secret-society intrigue, it’s not to be missed. Read an exclusive extract here.

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Apr 06, 2020
Check out the latest releases in YA graphic novels and comics!
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Apr 06, 2020
"You’ll feel right at home among our fastidiously maintained gardens and horticulture, bustling local arts scene, and internationally renowned murder rate."
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Apr 06, 2020
Your guide to all things spring 2020 YA books. We guarantee you'll find a book or two to love.
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Apr 06, 2020
Whine. Watch all the adaptations. Aggressively hint about wishlist books. It's your party and you'll be bookish if you want to.
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Apr 06, 2020
Whether you're looking for free, printable short poems for kids, or rhyming poems for kids, these websites featuring free poetry for kids have you covered.
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Apr 06, 2020
Here are a few fascinating internet series, columns, and blogs about the North American English language (from American and Canadian perspectives).
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